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The Difference Between Surveying and Quantity Surveying
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The Difference Between Surveying and Quantity Surveying

Last Updated on February 28, 2024 by Admin

Are you confused about the difference between surveying and quantity surveying? You’re not alone! While both professions involve measuring land and buildings, they have distinct roles in the construction industry. If you want to know more about these two fields, prepare for an informative read that clarifies misconceptions. Here we’ll explore the differences between surveying and quantity surveying so you can make informed decisions regarding your building projects. Let’s dive right in!

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What is Surveying?

Surveying measures and maps the physical properties of land, buildings, and other structures. It involves collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data to represent the environment accurately.

Surveying is essential in many fields, including Civil Engineering, Construction, Mining, Forestry, and Environmental Management.

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The primary objective of surveying is to establish accurate measurements and precise locations of objects, landmarks, and natural or built environment features. Surveying can be used to:

  • Determine property boundaries and land ownership
  • Create topographical maps and charts for construction and land management purposes
  • Design and construct buildings, roads, bridges, and other structures
  • Measure and monitor natural resources such as water, forests, and minerals
  • Assist with disaster management and emergency response planning

Surveying is a highly specialized field that requires the use of advanced instruments and techniques, including:

Surveying also involves using various mathematical formulas and calculations to ensure the accuracy and precision of measurements. These formulas include trigonometry, geometry, and calculus.

Overall, surveying plays a critical role in many areas of Civil Engineering and other related fields and is essential for planning, designing, and constructing infrastructure and other projects.

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What is Quantity Surveying?

Quantity surveying (QS) estimates and manages the costs and materials required for construction projects. Quantity surveyors are professionals responsible for managing construction projects’ financial and legal aspects, including budgeting, cost estimating, and procurement.

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The primary objective of quantity surveying is to ensure that construction projects are completed within budget, on time, and to the desired quality standards.

Quantity surveyors work closely with architects, engineers, contractors, and other stakeholders to estimate the cost of materials, labor, equipment, and other resources required for a project.

Quantity surveying involves the use of various techniques and tools, including:

  • Bill of Quantities (BOQ): A detailed list of all the materials, labor, and other resources required for a construction project.
  • Cost Estimation: The process of estimating the total cost of a project based on the BOQ and other factors such as inflation, market conditions, and labor rates.
  • Value Engineering: The process of finding ways to reduce the cost of a project without sacrificing quality or performance.
  • Procurement: Sourcing and acquiring the materials, labor, and equipment required for a project.

Quantity surveyors are also responsible for managing the financial and legal aspects of a project, including:

  • Contract Administration: The process of managing the contract between the owner and the contractor, including payment schedules, change orders, and dispute resolution.
  • Cost Control: Monitoring the project budget and ensuring that the project stays within budget.
  • Risk Management: Identifying and mitigating potential risks that could affect the project budget or schedule.

Overall, quantity surveying is an essential aspect of construction project management and critical in ensuring construction projects’ success.

Differences Between Surveying and Quantity Surveying

Surveying and quantity surveying are two distinct branches of Civil Engineering that are often confused. While surveying deals with measuring and mapping physical properties of land, buildings, and other structures, quantity surveying deals with estimating and measuring materials required for construction projects.

Here are the differences between surveying and quantity surveying in tabular format:

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Aspect Surveying Quantity Surveying
Definition The measurement and mapping of physical properties of land, buildings, and other structures. The estimation and measurement of materials required for construction projects.
Objective Collect data to create maps, plans, and topographical models to support design and construction projects. To estimate and measure the materials required for construction projects and ensure that the project is completed within budget.
Scope Includes land surveying, building surveying, hydrographic surveying, and engineering surveying. Includes cost estimation, material estimation, project planning, and procurement.
Techniques and Tools Uses various instruments such as theodolites, total stations, GPS, and computer software for data collection and analysis. Uses techniques such as bill of quantities, cost estimating, and value engineering for material estimation and cost control.
Applications Used in civil engineering, construction, land development, mining, and other fields. Used in construction projects of all types and sizes, from small residential buildings to large commercial and infrastructure projects.
Importance Essential for the design, planning, and construction of any project involving land or structures. Essential for ensuring that construction projects are completed on time, within budget, and to the desired quality standards.
Table: Differences Between Surveying and Quantity Surveying

Conclusion

In summary, while surveying and quantity surveying are important fields in Civil Engineering, their objectives, scope, techniques, and tools differ. Surveying focuses on measuring and mapping physical properties, while quantity surveying focuses on estimating and measuring the materials required for construction projects. Both fields are essential for the successful completion of any construction project. It is important to understand their differences to ensure that the right skills and expertise are utilized in each project stage.

FAQs

What are quantity and survey?

Quantity refers to the amount or number of something, such as materials or labor required for a construction project. A survey is a process of measuring and mapping the physical features of the land, such as its boundaries, contours, and elevations.

What is the relationship between quantity surveyors and architects?

Quantity surveyors and architects work together on construction projects to ensure that the project is completed on time and within budget. The architect is responsible for designing the building or structure, while the quantity surveyor is responsible for estimating and managing the costs and materials required for the project.

What’s the difference between a quantity surveyor and a chartered surveyor?

A quantity surveyor specializes in estimating and managing the costs and materials required for construction projects. A chartered surveyor is a broader term encompassing professionals who provide a wide range of property-related services, including surveying, valuation, and property management.

What is the difference between a survey and a surveyor?

A survey is the process of measuring and mapping physical features of the land, while a surveyor is a professional who performs surveys and provides related services.

What are the two types of surveying?

The two types of surveying are:
Land surveying: This involves the measurement and mapping of land and its physical features, such as boundaries, contours, and elevations.
Construction surveying: This involves the measurement and layout of structures and features within a construction site, such as buildings, roads, and utilities.

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